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styled()

If you're looking for a full list of style properties accepted by Tamagui, see the Styles page.

Create a new component by extending an existing one:

import { GetProps, View, styled } from '@tamagui/core'
export const Circle = styled(View, {
name: 'Circle', // useful for debugging, and Component themes
borderRadius: 100_000_000,
})
// helper to get props for any TamaguiComponent
export type CircleProps = GetProps<typeof Circle>

Usage:

<Circle x={10} y={10} backgroundColor="red" />

Note, tamagui and @tamagui/core both export many of the same helpers, like styled. If you are using tamagui, you don't need to ever add @tamagui/core to your package.json or import it and can instead import directly from tamagui itself and don't need the following.

You can pass any prop that is supported by the component you are extending, even variants of the parent component. Tamagui will figure out the style props up-front, turn them into classNames, and then pass the non-style props down to the component as defaultProps.

One really important and useful thing to note about Tamagui style properties: the order is important! Read more below

Variants

Let's add some variants:

import { View, styled } from '@tamagui/core'
export const Circle = styled(View, {
borderRadius: 100_000_000,
variants: {
pin: {
top: {
position: 'absolute',
top: 0,
},
},
centered: {
true: {
alignItems: 'center',
justifyContent: 'center',
},
},
size: {
'...size': (size, { tokens }) => {
return {
width: tokens.size[size] ?? size,
height: tokens.size[size] ?? size,
}
},
},
} as const,
})

Please use as const for the variants definition until Typescript gains the ability to infer generics as const .

We can use these like so:

<Circle pin="top" centered size="$lg" />

To learn more about to use them and all the special types, see the docs on variants.

Non-working React Native views

You can assume all "utility" views in React Native are not supported: Pressable, TouchableOpacity, and others. They have specific logic for handling events that conflicts with Tamagui. We could support these in the future, but we don't plan on it - you can get all of Pressable functionality for the most part within Tamagui itself, and if you need something outside of it, you can use Pressable directly.

Using on the web

The styled() function supports Tamagui views, React Native views, and any other React component that accepts a style prop. If you wrap an external component that Tamagui doesn't recognize, Tamagui will assume it only supports the style prop and not optimize it.

If it does accept className, you can opt-in to className, CSS media queries, and compile-time optimization by adding acceptsClassName:

import { SomeCustomComponent } from 'some-library'
import { styled } from 'tamagui' // or '@tamagui/core'
export const TamaguiCustomComponent = styled(SomeCustomComponent, {
acceptsClassName: true,
})

styleable

Any component created with styled() has a new static property on it called .styleable().

If you want a functional component that renders a Tamagui-styled component inside of it to also be able to be styled(), you need to wrap it with styleable. This is a mouthful, let's see an example:

// 1. you create a `styled` component as usual:
const StyledText = styled(Text)
// 2. you create a wrapper component that adds some logic
// but still returns a styled component that receives the props:
const HigherOrderStyledText = (props) => <StyledText {...props} />
// 3. you want that wrapper component itself to be able to use with `styled`:
const StyledHigherOrderStyledText = styled(HigherOrderStyledText, {
variants: {
// oops, variants will merge incorrectly
},
})

The above code will generally cause weird issues, because Tamagui can't know that it needs to just forward some props down. Instead, Tamagui tries to "resolve" all the style props from StyledHigherOrderStyledText before passing them down to HigherOrderStyledText. But that causes problems, because now HigherOrderStyledText will merge things differently than you'd expect.

The way to fix this is to add a .styleable around your HigherOrderStyledText. You'll also want to forward the ref, which is forwarded for you:

const StyledText = styled(Text)
// note the styleable wrapper here:
const HigherOrderStyledText = StyledText.styleable((props, ref) => (
<StyledText ref={ref} {...props} />
))
const StyledHigherOrderStyledText = styled(HigherOrderStyledText, {
variants: {
// variants now merge correctly
},
})

Now your component will handle everything properly, even if a theme is changed on HigherOrderStyledText, it will be applied.

A final note: you must pass all Tamagui style props given to HigherOrderStyledText down to a single StyledText, at least if you want everything to work fully correctly.

And if you'd like to add new props on top of the existing props, you can pass them in for the first generic type argument of styleable:

import { View, ViewProps } from '@tamagui/core'
type ExtraProps = {
someCustomProp: boolean
}
export type CustomProps = ViewProps & ExtraProps
const Custom = View.styleable<ExtraProps>((props) => {
// ...
return null
})

createStyledContext

When building a "Composable Component API", you need a way to pass properties down to multiple related components at once.

What is a Composable Component API? It looks like this:

export default () => (
<Button size="$large">
<Button.Icon>
<Icon />
</Button.Icon>
<Button.Text>Lorem ipsum</Button.Text>
</Button>
)

Note how the size="$large" is set on the outer Button frame. We'd expect this size property to pass down to both the Icon and Text so that our frame size always matches the icon and text size. It would be cumbersome and bug-prone to have to always pass the size to every sub-component.

Tamagui solves this with createStyledContext which acts much like React createContext, except it only works with styled components and only controls their variants (for now, we're exploring if it can do more).

You can set it up as follows:

import {
SizeTokens,
View,
Text,
createStyledContext,
styled,
withStaticProperties,
} from '@tamagui/core'
export const ButtonContext = createStyledContext<{ size: SizeTokens }>({
size: '$medium',
})
export const ButtonFrame = styled(View, {
name: 'Button',
context: ButtonContext,
variants: {
size: {
'...size': (name, { tokens }) => {
return {
height: tokens.size[name],
borderRadius: tokens.radius[name],
gap: tokens.space[name].val * 0.2,
}
},
},
} as const,
defaultVariants: {
size: '$medium',
},
})
export const ButtonText = styled(Text, {
name: 'ButtonText',
context: ButtonContext,
variants: {
size: {
'...fontSize': (name, { font }) => ({
fontSize: font?.size[name],
}),
},
} as const,
})
export const Button = withStaticProperties(ButtonFrame, {
Props: ButtonContext.Provider,
Text: ButtonText,
})

A few things to note here:

  • ButtonContext should only be typed and given properties that work across both components. Since they both define a size variant, this works.
  • But note that one defines ...size while the other defines ...fontSize. This works in this case only if your design system has consistent naming for token sizes across size and fontSize (and is why we highly recommend this pattern).
  • You can use <Button.Props size="$large"><Button /></Button.Props> now to set default props for a Button from above.
  • As of today, using context pattern does not work with the optimizing compiler flattening functionality. So we recommend not using this for your most common components like Stacks or Text. But for Button or anything higher level it's totally fine - it will still extract CSS and remove some logic from the render function. We've mapped out how this can work with flattening eventually and it shouldn't be too much effort.

Order is important

Finally, it's important to note that the order of style properties is significant. This is really important for two reasons:

  1. You want to control which styles are overridden.
  2. You have a variant that expands into multiple style properties, and you need to control it.

Lets see how it lets us control overriding styles:

import { View, ViewProps } from '@tamagui/core'
export default (props: ViewProps) => (
<View background="red" {...props} width={200} />
)

In this case we set a default background to red, but it can be overridden by props. But we set width after the prop spread, so width is always going to be set to 200.

It also is necessary for variants to make sense. Say we have a variant huge that sets scale to 2 and borderRadius to 100:

// this will be scale = 3
export default (props: ViewProps) => (
<MyView huge scale={3} />
)
// this will be scale = 2
export default (props: ViewProps) => (
<MyView scale={3} huge />
)

If order wasn't important, how would you expect these two different usages to work? You'd have to make order important somewhere. If you do it in the styled() helper somewhere, you end up having no flexibility and would end up with boilerplate. Making the prop order important gives us maximum expressiveness and is easy to understand.

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Advanced

You can skip this section unless you're building out very rich components that are nested multiple levels and need variants at each level.

Custom props that accepts tokens with accept

accept

If you are wrapping something like an SVG, you may want it to accept theme and token values on certain props, for example fill. You can do so using accept:

const StyledSVG = styled(SVG, {}, {
accept: {
fill: 'color'
} as const
})

Note the as const, until we can drop TypeScript 4 support. Now, your StyledSVG will properly type the fill property to accept token and theme values and will pass the resolved colors to the SVG component.

You can also use accept to take in Tamagui style objects and output React Native style objects. This is useful for things like the contentContainerStyle prop on ScrollView, which expects a style object:

const MyScrollView = styled(ScrollView, {}, {
accept: {
contentContainerStyle: 'style' // or 'textStyle'
} as const
})